View this PageEdit this PageUploads to this PageHistory of this PageHomeRecent ChangesSearchHelp Guide

With Liberty and Voting for All


Citizens of the United States of America have several constitutionally protected rights granted to them — the right to assembly, to free speech, to freedom of religion, and freedom to complain about the government, among other things. Strangely enough, for a piece of the political process that is so important in American society, there is no nationally recognized right to vote.

Oh, there's a right to vote, but it's about as rickety as the right for people to marry whoever they want, and there's been enough in the press about 'gay marriage amendments' to prove how stable that is. Voting rights are rights given by the states to their citizens — hardly a fair proposition in the case of such things as national elections.

Even in the consititution, where there are amendments that supposedly grant voting rights to women and people over the age of 18, these rights are not automatically guaranteed to these groups of people, and merely that they cannot be refused their rights on account of age or sex. Why would the consititution have such language to avoid granting such rights outright, if only to say "but there are other ways to restrict those rights"?

In 11 different states (the majority of which are in the southeast), felons are barred for life from voting, while in Maine convicts can vote practically from their jail cells. The constitution does not address the voting rights of jailed individuals, or of felons. In the south, where a statistically disproportionate number of jailed/ convicted citizens are poor or of an ethnic/racial minority, such laws and rulings could be used by states to disenfranchise minority voters.

The format of the voting system, whether it be by punch-card or by touch-screen, should be uniform across the board, but only because the requirements needed to vote should also be as uniform as possible. The United States is one of only 11 countries whose national consititution does not explicitly give this right, and it should proceed as quickly as it can to reduce that number from 11 to 10.


a piece of advice from a viewer:
I think that the author did a great work on drafting this paper. However, personally, I hope that I can see some of the information in the further version, on which the author's opinion is based.
to illustrate, "In 11 different states (the majority of which are in the southeast), felons are barred for life from voting, while in Maine convicts can vote practically from their jail cells. The constitution does not address the voting rights of jailed individuals, or of felons. In the south, where a statistically disproportionate number of jailed/ convicted citizens are poor or of an ethnic/racial minority, such laws and rulings could be used by states to disenfranchise minority voters. "
here, could you provide the original text content of the sources from which you've drawn your own conclusion? By doing so, I believer, your "effectiveness at efficiently and wisely using print,web, and other sources" will be better reflected.

I think that you’ve written this paper very well in order to convince the reader. You have put forth a lot of the problems and inconsistencies with the current state of voting in our country. I think it would be helpful for you to elaborate on some of the issues that you have raised by adding quotes or more statistics. Another thing that could help your paper is maybe offering some solutions or ways that we can change it. Because you have convinced the reader that we need reform, this would solve any doubts that they have. Also you should address the people who are against it and why. If you can refute them then you will really convince your audience without a doubt.
qwaish


Links to this Page